Penrhyn Estuary Saltmarsh Rehabilitation

link to video runs 30 minutes:  Planning, implementation and results of a constructed saltmarsh at Penrhyn Estuary, Port Botany :: Peggy O’Donnell, Geoff Sainty and Mia Dalby-Ball :: Seminar 2014 – AABR

Saltmarsh translocation and construction, Penrhyn Estuary, Port Botany, NSW

Mia Dalby-Ball and Andre Olson 7th March 2016  see link.

From June 2008 to June 2011, ecological restoration work was conducted by Port Authority of NSW in association with the expansion of the port at Port Botany, Sydney, NSW. The purpose was to expand and rehabilitate Penrhyn Estuary.

The saltmarsh works at Penrhyn Estuary involved 2.4 hectares being densely planted with saltmarsh species. In addition to this 3000m2 of saltmarsh was translocated within Penrhyn Estuary. The key driver for the saltmarsh design and plant selection was the requirement for the project to provide habitat for migratory wading birds.

There were many key aspects to the project. Primary among them was the engagement of an expert to undertake a pre-words evaluation and design the wetland construction. It was also important that planning involved representatives from different disciplines including those who would be doing the on-ground work and those monitoring migratory birds. Another key aspect was that approvals and licenses were identified and obtained early.

Saltmarsh construction. Seed collection (from local sources) and plant growing was carried out more than a year before plants were required. (This is because saltmarsh plants are slow to grow, there is a narrow window of time for seed collection and permits are required to collect seed or pieces.)

Implementation works first involved removal of dune weeds (Bitou-Bush, Chrysanthemum monilifera ssp. rotundifolia) and saltmarsh weeds, in particular Spiny Rush (Juncus acutus) of which large plants were hand removed and or cut and painted with herbicide. Germinating seedlings were irrigated with Saltwater. Monthly inspections undertaken with immediate removal of new plants.

This was followed by excavation of land so that it became inundated by monthly high tides. (Monitoring of tidal inundation was carried out to test that levels were appropriate and areas that had water pooling in excess of five days were filled.)

Soil conditioner (organic rich soil) was spread over the sandy substrate and mixed to 100mm, using cultivation equipment. This was followed by planting of over 250,000 saltmarsh plants including of Beaded Glasswort (Sarcocornia quinqueflora) and Salt Couch (Sporobolus virginicus). All saltmarsh plantings were irrigated with fresh water via a sprinkler system.

Translocation of saltmarsh. A 3000m2 area of Beaded Glasswort and Salt Couch was growing on an area that was to be excavated to become mudflats. This area was cut into ~ 20cm x 20cm blocks with 100mm deep soil and lifted by hand (shovels) and put onto wooden sheets (plywood) and transported to the recipient site. Transportation was chiefly by a small boat with electric motor (Fig 1).

The saltmarsh was translocated to the site where the Spiny Rush had been removed. At the recipient site it was planted into the substrate (Fig 2). Spaces between blocks were filled with soil from the donor site. The entire area was irrigated thoroughly with salt water. Irrigation continued for six months while the transplanted material established.

Monitoring. Monitoring existing saltmarsh and proposed saltmarsh creation sites prior to, during and for 2 years post works. Additional monitoring has been conducted for a further 3 years.

Lessons learned. At over 230,000 saltmarsh plantings, to our knowledge this is the largest recorded saltmarsh construction project recorded to date. A number of findings have resulted from the project, particularly our trials to arrive at a suitable growing medium for the plantings. We sought a soil that had free drainage good moisture retention properties and contained available nutrients. Fertiliser tablets alone are insufficient in sandy soils. We trialed a range of soil conditioners, with the most successful having high organic content and did not float. Irrigation is required as tidal inundation is not adequate to keep soil moist for seedlings. We found that irrigation was required for at least 6 months

Acknowledgements: Design and pre-works site evaluation was conducted by Geoff Sainty of Sainty and Associates and BioAnalysis.  Implementation and monitoring of saltmarsh during construction and establishment phase (two years monitoring) was carried out by Dragonfly Environmental.  Cardno (NSW/ACT) has been conducting environmental monitoring post establishment phase.

Contact: Mia Dalby-Ball, Ecological Consultants Australia, 30 Palmgrove Road,  Avalon NSW 2107, Australia (Tel: 0488 481 929; Email: ecologicalca@outlook.com) or Andre Olson, Dragonfly Environmental, 1/33 Avalon Parade, Avalon NSW 2107 Australia (andre@dfe.net.au).

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